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The Top Ten Books
People Lie About Reading

The Federalist, by Ben Domenech

Original Article

Posted By:earlybird, 1/17/2014 11:15:59 AM

Have you ever lied about reading a book? Maybe you didn’t want to seem stupid in front of someone you respected. Maybe you rationalized it by reasoning that you had a familiarity with the book, or knew who the author was, or what the story was about, or had glanced at its Wikipedia page. Or maybe you had tried to read the book, even bought it and set it by your bed for months unopened, hoping that it would impart what was in it merely via proximity (if that worked, please email me). There’s a great poem by Joseph Bottum

Comments:
The poem is fun.

And there´s a list...

      


Post Reply  

Reply 1 - Posted by: Rather Read, 1/17/2014 11:24:28 AM     (No. 9695645)

I´ve read several books on the list: Tale of Two Cities, 1984, Moby Dick and The Prince. I´ve had the chance to read Ulysses several times, but life is too short.

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Reply 2 - Posted by: Calvinesq, 1/17/2014 11:37:54 AM     (No. 9695674)

Brings to mind that old Jimmy Durante song:

"I´ll never forget the day I read a book.
It was contagious, seventy pages.
There were pictures here and there,
So it wasn´t hard to bear,
The day I read a book.

It´s a shame I don´t recall the name of the book.
It wasn´t a history. I know because it had no plot.
It wasn´t a mystery, because nobody there got shot.
The day I read a book? I can´t remember when,
But one o´ these days, I´m gonna do it again. Yes sir. But one o´ these days, I´m gonna do it again!"

Cracks me up every time.

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R-G1
  
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Reply 3 - Posted by: SoCalGal, 1/17/2014 11:39:31 AM     (No. 9695678)

From an article linked in this one, a tidbit with which to impress your friends:

The printer Aldus Manutius created what Mr. Manguel calls ´´the most beautiful books ever made.´´ One of his greatest creations was a series of ´´exquisite little books that were the first pocket books of the classics.´´ Printed in Greek and Latin, they were published when ´´the ancients were read very much as contemporary, and the discovery of a new essay by Cicero was as fashionable or as interesting as Tom Wolfe.´´ Knowing the market, Manutius sized the books with the ´´intention that they would be read by everybody.´´ (Snip)´The aristocracy of the time, he says, ´´would buy them and put them on the shelf.´´

And not only the aristocracy. The 1535 ´´Price List of the Whores of Venice,´´ a racy catalog that detailed the services each woman would perform, includes, Mr. Manguel says, an entry for one Lucrezia Squarcia, a prostitute who, according to the guide, was ´´always with a pocket book of Petrarch, Virgil and sometimes even Homer.´´

The price guide went on to say that Lucrezia only pretended to love poetry.But in the desire to impress, perhaps there is a little Lucrezia Squarcia in all of us.


http://www.nytimes.com/2000/07/15/books/think-tank-let-us-now-praise-books-well-sold-well-loved-but-seldom-read.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm

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Reply 4 - Posted by: BaseballFan, 1/17/2014 11:40:04 AM     (No. 9695680)

Well, I feel good about having read the top four on his list. But my tastes run more to biographies and history.

FTA: Democracy in America, Alexis De Tocqueville: Politicians are the worst about this, quoting and misquoting the writings of the Tocqueville without ever bothering to actually read this essential work. But politicians do this a lot – with The Federalist Papers and The Constitution, too.

BRAVO, Mr. Domenech !!

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Reply 5 - Posted by: StormCnter, 1/17/2014 11:44:06 AM     (No. 9695688)

Every Texas tenth grader was exposed to A Tale of Two Cities. In my class, we read it, watched the movie and then wrote and produced our own stage version.

Moby Dick is another that most of us read during high school. The rest of that list doesn´t interest me, so I´ve never fibbed about reading them.

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Reply 6 - Posted by: LadyVet, 1/17/2014 11:52:34 AM     (No. 9695711)

The Bible is the one that most people lie about reading. They also quote from it in a pretentious manner and put their hand on it to swear an oath of office. Then they toss it aside and the security detail and clean-up crew have to try to find it to return it to the library or museum.

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Reply 7 - Posted by: Heraclitus, 1/17/2014 11:52:40 AM     (No. 9695712)

A couple of months ago an article was posted about having the courage to NOT finish reading a book! I´ve got "current events" books which fit that category.

And then there are a few works of fiction, supposedly indisputably "important" which i have found not worth slogging through.

The list in the HuffPost link is a good and amusing one. "War and Peace" was pretty tedious, and i say that as a lover of Russian lit! But i got through it. Unlike almost all the other Russian works, i have not re-read W & P.

I now have the courage to "dis-hoard" myself and to donate books which allow myself not
to finish.

Maybe i have enough lifetime to re-read "The Brothers Karamazov" (Dostoevsky) and "The Pickwick Papers" (Dickens); Aristotle´s "The Politics" and "Nicomachean Ethics" and Plato´s "The Republic" (really ought to re-read this now that the Overseers are over-seeing us...)

But before the end of my life, there are many books i hope to re-read, some to read for the first time and a few others which i read joyously again and again (Homer, Greek tragedies for example), and of course, history, mostly ancient, and really really ancient, too.

And i will always enjoy reading fellow Ldotters´ Comments: often funny, encouraging and enlightening.


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Reply 8 - Posted by: joew9, 1/17/2014 11:59:31 AM     (No. 9695728)

#2 Thanks. That was excellent.
I found the song on youtube.



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Reply 9 - Posted by: Eheu Fugaces, 1/17/2014 12:05:51 PM     (No. 9695738)

Dear Messrs Domenech and Kinsley and Whoever: Actually reading "A la Recherché du Temps Perdu" (or at least 4 volumes of it), "War and Peace", "Crime and Punishment" and "Les Miserables" doesn´t mean someone is weird or lying: it simply means they´re a Pre-Baby Boomers.

Similarly, the whole of the Federalist Papers, and large segments of Adam Smith, John Locke, Herbert Spencer, etc. were required reading in high school -- and no, we´re not talking about an "elite private school", we´re talking about an ordinary High School.

True, "Ulysses" is universally acclaimed to be a Masterpiece by all who claim to know, but you couldn´t tell it from me; I found it completely unreadable except for the last page and a half. I firmly believe it was a giant leg-pull on the part of James Joyce. I also confess to finding the oeuvre of Ayn Rand heavy going, what with her weird and wooden characters spouting pages of political polemic, but then the poor woman was permanently scarred by having to live through the October Revolution as a teenager, and the communization of Russia as a college kid.

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Reply 10 - Posted by: cjjeepercreeper, 1/17/2014 12:09:03 PM     (No. 9695742)

Being a voracious reader of anything and everything I totally enjoyed this article. And yes, I have read several of the books on there, and attempted a couple others (for some reason I can´t make it through Atlas Shrugged). There is one book I would love to ask Ldotters if anyone has actually read it, I have tried numerous times--Being and Nothingness by Jean Paul Sartre. I was a Philosophy major and still can´t read it!

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Reply 11 - Posted by: deepthinker, 1/17/2014 12:12:24 PM     (No. 9695747)

Note to #7. Some years back, when I used a subway to commute to work, I found that reading a chapter of Pickwick Papers fit almost precisely into the duration of my trip. Like so much of Dickens, some is brilliant--and some is kind of plodding.

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Reply 12 - Posted by: lil dotty, 1/17/2014 12:18:29 PM     (No. 9695763)

Stepping into the character of Seinfeld´s George....´I saw the movies´


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Reply 13 - Posted by: squid, 1/17/2014 12:28:38 PM     (No. 9695783)

I have read about 6 of the books on the list. Recently I discovered https://librivox.org/

This organization records public domain books, from philosophy to pulp fiction. There are thousands of recordings. They are free to download.

During my morning or evening commute, I will listen. It is really nice

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Reply 14 - Posted by: old north state, 1/17/2014 12:35:48 PM     (No. 9695797)

I wouldn´t get too worked up about having read or not read books on a particular list. Times change. If you have read Steinbeck you have read pretty much everything Dickens had to say. Ulysses was a style experiment and if you don´t like the style, why put up with the impenetrability? The Art of War? Seemed like a collection of the obvious to me, but hey, just like the rest; a chacun son gout.

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Reply 15 - Posted by: BigGeorgeTX, 1/17/2014 1:03:33 PM     (No. 9695832)

I´m surprised The Bible isn´t on the list.

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Reply 16 - Posted by: choey, 1/17/2014 1:11:44 PM     (No. 9695841)

Have to agree with #9 on Ulysses. I got about 30 pages into it and then threw it in the trash. It´s completely unreadable. I did enjoy the Dickens stories though. Especially the names of his characters.

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Reply 17 - Posted by: tank, 1/17/2014 1:13:59 PM     (No. 9695846)

SLogged through many of those, including Atlas Shrugged and Foundation. Was on a kick a couple of years ago to read the ´´Classics,´´ but sort of petered out. I´d still like to pick up Ulysses, and I really should read Smith and DeToqueville, but I´m a sucker for sci-fi and crime novels.

However, I´ve read almost everything Steinbeck wrote, most of Mark Twain. And came to the realization the other day while reading the fly leaf in my latest book, that I´ve read everything Elmore Leonard ever wrote. Well, except ´´Raylan,´´ but I´m currently five chapters in.

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Reply 18 - Posted by: Hazymac, 1/17/2014 1:37:50 PM     (No. 9695881)

Anyone of faith should read the Bible, not only to implant its words into the spirit, but to be able to recognize biblical allusions in our speech and reading. Purely as literature, the Bible is a treasure trove. If one has the tenacity to spend a few minutes a day reading it over one year, getting through it isn´t too tough. There are plenty of yearly reading plans online. Reading it in its entirety between January and May of 1996 has paid me many dividends. I hope to read it all again.

The Art of War is, IMO, the second most important book ever written, and is brief enough to read in a couple of hours. Ostensibly about military strategy, Sun Tzu´s timeless book is actually about how to interact with other people.

Long ago I read Ayn Rand´s Anthem, and bought Atlas Shrugged, but haven´t gotten around to reading the final nine hundred pages or so. Ah, well.

William Faulkner had his wife read Joyce´s Ulysses during their honeymoon. (That must have been a fun honeymoon!) The book is difficult, but Joyce´s sometimes elusive genius makes it worth the effort. Joyce´s impenetrable Finnegan´s Wake is also on my bookshelf. Although I have made several efforts to get inside it (and it inside me), those efforts were of no avail. I guess I´m just not smart enough. Maybe nobody is.

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Reply 19 - Posted by: StormCnter, 1/17/2014 1:40:11 PM     (No. 9695887)

"Reading it in its entirety between January and May of 1996 has paid me many dividends."

But admit it, you skipped the begats, as did the rest of us.

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Reply 20 - Posted by: mindyourbubble, 1/17/2014 1:47:34 PM     (No. 9695903)

I was surprised that "The Divine Comedy" was not on the list.
I´m on about my 30th try.
Usually by the time I reach Canto VII of Purgatory, the book gathers another 5 or so years of dust. I always start at the beginning because I remember little of what I had read in the past.

There is a book out now named "The singularity hypothesis" Amnon H. Eden (Editor). An idea that at some time in the future something will occur which will cause a step-function event that will cause a permanent change of the world and its people, flora and fauna.(I guess)

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Reply 21 - Posted by: Teleologicus, 1/17/2014 2:07:03 PM     (No. 9695918)

#18 -

Joyce´s elusive genius has thus far eluded me - and since I have had no difficulties comprehending or appreciating any of the other works that used to be widely praised and recommended by the bien-pensant, I have at last concluded that this is not my problem at all, but the author´s. But all who like the Joycean mode are welcome to it. There is more than enough to go around, and with plenty left over to spare.

And though I am probably largely in sympathy with Ayn Rand´s politics, I have never gotten past the first fifty pages of any of her novels. If there are more detestable, more nauseatingly narcissistic characters in literature than her protagonists, I haven´t found them. Her fictional people give her a philosophy a bad name. How fans can abide them is a mystery.

Left off the list is Milton´s "Paradise Lost," of which Dr. Johnson famously and candidly observed that "none ever wished it longer than it is."

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Reply 22 - Posted by: Hazymac, 1/17/2014 2:12:25 PM     (No. 9695921)

Re #19: In 1995 my pastor, speaking about the worthy habit of reading scripture, told the congregation not to skip the geneological lists because we could get healed on the begats. That idea stuck in my mind, and in my spirit, as if it had been fused there by a divine fire. So I can truly say that I have read the Bible (KJV) in its entirety. Really. And I hope to do it again.

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Reply 23 - Posted by: JHHolliday, 1/17/2014 2:27:57 PM     (No. 9695948)

Speaking of books that I couldn´t finish...I bout Hawkings´ ´A Brief History of Time. I read somewhere that it was the most half-read book ever published so I was determined to finish it. I punished myself and finished it but the last half might as well have been printed in Sanskrit for all I understood. Completely unintelligible to a normal brain.

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Reply 24 - Posted by: Annalucia, 1/17/2014 2:39:39 PM     (No. 9695968)

I had to read "The Tale of Two Cities" in high school, and I´ve read Alexis de Toqueville on my own. I got about halfway through "Ulysses" - it was a hard slog, then one day I said to myself, "Why am I doing this?" closed the book and never picked it up again.

To the commenter having trouble with the Divine Comedy: try Dorothy Sayers´ translation. It´s out in Penguin and is wonderfully readable.

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Reply 25 - Posted by: MysteryLover, 1/17/2014 3:39:53 PM     (No. 9696017)

I´ve read most , but not all of the authors list. Enjoyed #22´s comment about reading the begats in the Bible. Sam´s Club has the ESV Daily Reading Bible which portions the Bible text into 365 daily readings. For me, it´s a marvelous way to read all the Bible in one year.

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Reply 26 - Posted by: mitzi, 1/17/2014 4:10:18 PM     (No. 9696048)

I didn´t read and have no intention of reading:

Art of War
The Wealth of Nations
Democracy in America
Origin of Species

I started Atlas Shrugged many times ... just couldn´t get into it. The paperback copy is in the bookcase. But, I´ve read several other Ayn Rand. Anthem is my favorite. Read that one a couple of times.

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Reply 27 - Posted by: ColonialAmerican1623, 1/18/2014 12:28:54 AM     (No. 9696485)

Just grateful he didn´t include Zippy´s books.

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Reply 28 - Posted by: dcbroome, 1/18/2014 8:44:31 AM     (No. 9696704)

I recommend reading "We the People" by Ayn Rand. Story is set in communist Russia and is haunting. One of those books that has stuck with me.

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Reply 29 - Posted by: mitzi, 1/18/2014 9:01:41 AM     (No. 9696730)

In recent months, three people have recommended Lord of the World by Robert Hugh Benson. I just started ready it a couple of days ago.

It´s been called apocalyptic fiction. It was written more than 100 years ago. It reads like it was written yesterday. There is a free Kindle download at Amazon.

The blurb at Amazon says:

In this profound and prescient novel, Monsignor Robert Hugh Benson gives us an imaginative foretelling of the end of the world. All stories, Aristotle said, have a beginning, a middle, and an end, but most ends are relative, the terminus of this chain of acts or that. But what of the end that terminates all human action as we know it, the end of time itself, the Second Coming? Since this novel appeared in 1906, many others have been devoted to nuclear disaster, destructive comets, and other hair-raising possibilities. What sets Benson’s story apart and makes it as readable today as when it was written is the Catholic and biblical context that provides the ultimate meaning.

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Reply 30 - Posted by: dcbroome, 1/18/2014 9:11:11 AM     (No. 9696740)

I meant "We the Living" in my above post. Whoops!

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Reply 31 - Posted by: zoidberg, 1/18/2014 9:16:31 AM     (No. 9696748)

Joyce´s talent as a writer is apparent if you read A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.

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Reply 32 - Posted by: mnwxyz, 1/18/2014 9:45:54 AM     (No. 9696790)

I tried to read Ulysses twice-- really TRIED, mind you. Couldn´t do it. It´s amusing to think that teenage boys once sought out Ulysses on the theory that it must be HOT-- like Dangerous Liaisons or Fanny Hill.

My own nominations for "books people lie about having read" would be anything written by Nietzsche or Kierkegaard. No, you didn´t read that impenetrable snoozefest! You´re lyin´.

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Reply 33 - Posted by: strike3, 1/18/2014 10:08:23 AM     (No. 9696834)

Egad, I´ve completed 7 of the 10. I need to get a life.

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Reply 34 - Posted by: ramona, 1/19/2014 10:00:22 AM     (No. 9697748)

Thanks, OP, for the post, and to all the rest of you for your contributions on this thread.

I never "got" Greek mythology - even child-friendly versions turned me off. Then a few years ago I read C. S. Lewis´ "Til We Have Faces." Oh My! This is the story of Cupid and Psyche, so magnificently told. I loved the Narnia stories - the stories more than the writing - but in "Faces" I discovered the intellectual and literary genius of Lewis.

Ramona (the Pest)

Ramona

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Posted By: earlybird- 4/12/2014 1:27:55 PM     Post Reply
LAS VEGAS -- The Bureau of Land Management has announced it will stop the roundup of cattle owned by rancher Cliven Bundy. The BLM says the animals have been illegally grazing on public lands for 20 years. The BLM made the announcement Saturday morning, a week after rangers started gathering the animals from land near Gold Butte. The agency says it is concerned about the safety of its employees and the public. Earlier this week, BLM officers and supporters of the Bundy family were involved in a scuffle. Cliven Bundy´s son, Ammon Bundy, was tased twice by federal agents. Another woman said



Most Active Articles (last 48 hours)



´America´s royal baby´: How Chelsea´s first
child could give Hillary Clinton a boost in
the polls if she runs for president in 2016

42 replie(s)
Daily Mail (U.K.), by Jessica Jerreat    Original Article
Posted By: Desert Fox- 4/19/2014 7:12:10 PM     Post Reply
For Hillary Clinton, having her own baby grandchild to kiss on the campaign trail, could be one of the biggest boosts to her possible presidential election campaign. Although the former Secretary of State and First Lady has not said if she will run in 2016, the arrival of her first grandchild will soften her image, analysts have said. While Chelsea only revealed her pregnancy on Thursday, supporters of her mother have already started cooing over a possible baby in the White House. With the Clintons having a near-royal status in the U.S., the announcement of a new arrival due this fall has sent

Living in the New York Times World
39 replie(s)
American Thinker, by J. Paul Masko    Original Article
Posted By: magnante- 4/19/2014 7:48:36 AM     Post Reply
I began reading the entirety of the first section of the New York Times at nine years old, and continued that practice, more or less, for decades.(snip) ...the power of reverence, intrinsic to what I call the “cascade” of The Times: the near avalanche-like flow and distribution of information through electronic and print networks: through like-minded network newscasts, magazines, local newspaper s, blogs, daytime talk TV, late-night entertainment, statements at media award ceremonies, the celebrity Twitterverse, etc. The cascade rolls through Saturday Night Live, Jon Stewart, The New Yorker, the mouths of third-grade teachers, Elmo, Madonna and Susan Sarandon …through

Barack Obama and the politics of lies
35 replie(s)
Washington Examiner [DC], by Editorial    Original Article
Posted By: StormCnter- 4/20/2014 5:45:25 AM     Post Reply
That was quite a victory dance President Obama did Thursday while claiming Obamacare is “working” because eight million people have now supposedly signed up for the health care program. He even indulged in some less-than-subtle mockery of Republicans - and by extension the majority of Americans who have disapproved of Obamacare since before it became law. "The repeal debate is and should be over,” Obama said, taking a dig at Republicans who are “going through, you know, the stages of grief … anger and denial and all that stuff …” But a president who is viewed by most Americans as less

In a Hole, Golf Considers
Digging a Wider One

32 replie(s)
New York Times, by Bill Pennington    Original Article
Posted By: Pluperfect- 4/19/2014 10:48:33 AM     Post Reply
GREENSBORO, Ga. — Golf holes the size of pizzas. Soccer balls on the back nine. A mulligan on every hole. These are some of the measures — some would say gimmicks — that golf courses across the country have experimented with to stop people from quitting the game. Golf has always reveled in its standards and rich tradition. But increasingly a victim of its own image and hidebound ways, golf has lost five million players in the last decade, according to the National Golf Foundation, with 20 percent of the existing 25 million golfers apt to quit in the next few years. People under 35 have especially spurned the game, saying it takes too

White House asks American parents to
monitor their children for signs of terrorism

32 replie(s)
Daily Caller, by Eric Owens    Original Article
Posted By: StormCnter- 4/19/2014 5:50:04 PM     Post Reply
In a speech earlier this week, Lisa O. Monaco, President Barack Obama’s assistant for homeland security and counterterrorism, insisted that American parents must be vigilant because their “confrontational” children could be on the verge of becoming terrorists. Monaco’s full, prepared text is available here. She presented the speech, entitled “Countering Violent Extremism and the Power of Community,” at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government on April 15. Monaco began her remarks by eloquently describing the lives tragically lost last year during the Boston Marathon bombings. Interestingly, the Harvard grad failed to mention the religion or the motive of brothers Dzhokhar and Tamerlan

Obama: ´For me, Easter is a story of hope,
a belief in a better day to come´

30 replie(s)
Investor´s Business Daily, by Andrew Malcolm    Original Article
Posted By: SurferLad- 4/19/2014 9:16:36 AM     Post Reply
Hi, everybody. For millions of Americans, this time of year holds great meaning. Earlier this week, we hosted a Passover Seder at the White House, and joined Jewish families around the world in their re-tellings of the story of the Exodus and the victory of faith over oppression. And this Sunday, Michelle, Malia, Sasha, and I will join our fellow Christians around the world in celebrating the Resurrection of Christ, the salvation he offered the world, and the hope that comes with the Easter season. These holy days have their roots in miracles that took place long ago. And yet, they still inspire us, guide us, and strengthen us today. They remind us of our

Harry Reid calls dissident Nevada ranchers
´domestic terrorists´ following show of
force against the federal government

30 replie(s)
Daily Mail [UK], by David Martosko    Original Article
Posted By: Attercliffe- 4/19/2014 9:29:17 AM     Post Reply
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid said Thursday that a family of dissident ranchers and their supporters in his home state of Nevada are ´domestic terrorists,´ citing this week´s standoff with the federal government´s Bureau of Land Management. Cliven Bundy has refused to pay grazing fees for land where his hundreds of cattle roam every day. The land is owned by the federal government, which says he owes more than $1 million. Bundy, however, insists that since his family has been using the land since the 1870s, Uncle Sam can´t collect the grazing fees. A tense standoff developed this week after

Ted Cruz, Invoking Reagan,
Angers GOP Colleagues
but Wins Fans Elsewhere

28 replie(s)
Wall Street Journal, by Monica Langley    Original Article
Posted By: JoniTx- 4/19/2014 8:09:17 AM     Post Reply
WASHINGTON--Rushing to an afternoon vote last month, Sen. Ted Cruz hopped the underground tram to the U.S. Capitol from his office across the street. The Texan planted his black ostrich cowboy boots in the middle of the small subway car without getting so much as a nod from the other senators--Republican or Democrat--amiably chatting or huddled in their seats. Mr. Cruz finds himself standing alone a lot these days. His response to the cold shoulders: "The establishment despised Ronald Reagan" before he became president, "but the people loved him." For the 43-year-old Republican, the Reagan name illuminates his political life´s

Stop dressing so tacky for church
27 replie(s)
CNN, by John Blake    Original Article
Posted By: StormCnter- 4/20/2014 4:40:56 AM     Post Reply
If the Rev. John DeBonville could preach a sermon to lift the souls of churchgoers across America, his message would be simple: Stop dressing so tacky for church. DeBonville has heard about the “come as you are” approach to dressing down for Sunday service, but he says the Sabbath is getting too sloppy. When he scans the pews of churches, DeBonville sees rows of people dressed in their Sunday worst. They saunter into church in baggy shorts, flip-flop sandals, tennis shoes and grubby T-shirts. Some even slide into the pews carrying coffee in plastic foam containers as if they’re going to Starbucks. “It’s like

Clintons celebrate Chelsea’s
pregnancy announcement

26 replie(s)
New York Post, by Stephanie Smith    Original Article
Posted By: JoniTx- 4/19/2014 8:32:52 AM     Post Reply
The Clintons had a busy night of celebrations after Chelsea announced she and husband Marc Mezvinsky are expecting a baby. Bill joined “House of Cards” star Kevin Spacey at the Revlon Rainforest Fund Benefit Concert at Carnegie Hall Thursday, joking of Spacey’s Machiavellian character, “When I was president people accused me of murder all the time, made a show of investigating. Spacey’s president for 15 minutes and he gets away with murder.” Spacey, who sang during the event with Sting, Stephen Stills and James Taylor, also showed off his Johnny Carson impression, taking a swipe at the coverage of Flight

The Growing Financial Disaster of Obamacare
22 replie(s)
Power Line, by John Hinderaker    Original Article
Posted By: StormCnter- 4/19/2014 5:55:20 PM     Post Reply
President Obama asserts that 8 million people have signed up for Obamacare, as though that were something to be proud of. In fact, Obamacare has always been a fiasco from a fiscal perspective–a black hole of subsidies and expanded Medicaid, with largely fictitious mechanisms in place to pay for it. As the number of subsidized participants grows, the disaster gets worse. Charles Blahous explains: Our national discussion…is missing the truly significant story here; what is unfolding before our eyes is a colossal fiscal disaster, poised to haunt legislators and taxpayers for decades to come. It is quite possible that the ACA is

Gospel story of Jesus’ resurrection a
source of deep rifts in Christian religion

21 replie(s)
Washington Post, by Kimberley Winston    Original Article
Posted By: NorthernDog- 4/19/2014 10:46:11 PM     Post Reply
“On the third day, he rose again.” That line, from the Nicene Creed, is a foundational statement of Christian belief. It declares that three days after Jesus died on the cross, he was resurrected, a glimmer of the eternal life promised to believers. It’s the heart of the Easter story in seven little words. But how that statement is interpreted is the source of some of the deepest rifts in Christianity — and a stumbling block for some Christians, and more than a few skeptics. Did Jesus literally come back from the dead in a bodily resurrection, as many traditionalist


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